October Freebie – The Very Busy Spider

How Many Ways Can You Count?  So Many Ways!

We’ve got another fun freebie for you, and this one is perfect for October because it comes straight from our unit for The Very Busy Spider. This is a counting activity but like all of the Read It Once Again curriculum, it can be used in so many different ways!  To get us started, here’s the link to the free download.

 

 

You can always use this activity as is–print it out and let your little friends match the web to the correct number of spiders on the other card.  This could be done in large group, small group, or one on one.  But don’t stop there!  There are so many more ways to use this activity!

Count the spiders file folder game.  Change the setting on your printer to print two pages per sheet, which will make the images smaller.  Then you can cut them out and glue them into a file folder.  Laminate the file folder, the extra pieces, and you’re ready to go!  You can put them in your math center for kiddos to use on their own, pull it out for morning work, or use it for one-on-one instruction.

 

Use this as a math bag activity.  If you aren’t already using math bags, you should be!  You can have these handy bags ready to go or send them home for extra practice with Mom and Dad.  A fun adaptation of this activity would be to include the web cards that show the numeral, and put plastic spiders in for the counting.

Fingerprint spider counting.  Print the webs with numerals, and have children use their fingers to make the correct number of spider bodies, then they can draw on the legs.  For kiddos who don’t like getting their hands dirty, just have them draw the spider or use a circle sponge dipped in paint or ink to make it.

 

 

Roll and count dice game.  Make this a game with the “cube of knowledge” by putting the cards with spiders on the cube. Have children roll the cube and then find the card with the corresponding number.  You can also incorporate the storyboard into this activity.  When the child rolls the cube, have them pull the card off of the cube and put it on the story board.  When they find the matching card, they can put it next to the card they rolled.

Spiders in a jar.  Save some plastic jars, or just use clear plastic cups, and tape a numbered web on to each one.  Children can sort out the correct number of spiders and drop them into the jars using plastic tweezers or tongs.  (You could also do this in a muffin tin if you print the webs smaller.) This would be a fun way to incorporate math and fine motor practice into your sensory play!

What number?  This is a variation of the “Guess Who” game from August’s freebie.  You can use the same folded sheets of card stock for this game.  Just put the cards with spiders inside of each “door.” Allow children to draw a card with a numbered Web on it from the Magical Bag of Mystery.  As you open the doors to reveal spiders on the webs, ask the children to help you count the spiders and then help you find the child who has the matching numeral to come up and place their card on the board.

Fine motor spider counting.  Start by gluing a plastic spider to a clothes pin.  Children will then use the clothes pins to clip the correct number of spiders to the numbered webs.  This would also make a great math bag activity!

 

 

 

For more information about using math bags in your classroom, visit TeachPreschool.  They’ve got some awesome tips!

 

Personally, what I love about so many of these activities is that I can print the materials once and use them in a variety of different ways so that my little friends don’t get bored.  All of these activities are teaching basically the same skills in different ways, which will help to reinforce the concepts while keeping things interesting.  I’m sure you’ll have a ton of different ideas for how you can use them in your classroom!  Tell me about them!  I want to hear your ideas!

 

About

Hi Friends! I have a master's degree in child and family studies, and I have worked for the last seven years as a special education preschool teacher in a public school system and also for a non-profit private school. I also have two children of my own, one of whom has autism. I love the Read It Once Again curriculum, but more importantly, I believe in it! I hope that this community will be one of collaboration through the sharing of stories, challenges, and successes. Let's talk about what's going on in your classrooms! We're here for you!

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Read It Once Again

Read It Once Again preschool curriculums incorporate traditional, familiar children's literature into thematic units to promote early literacy. The curriculums include objectives, activities, and assessments necessary to provide young children with a language rich educational program to meet the basic needs in each of the five domains commonly addressed in the prekindergarten classroom. While the curriculum is appropriate for all young children, Read It Once Again uniquely uses rhyme, rhythm and repetition as the foundational approach to teaching, making this curriculum especially effective for children with autism, language delays, or developmental delays.